Wednesday, January 10, 2018

Temperature Blanket

October and November Temperatures from 2016

I first heard about the idea of a temperature blanket some where in the middle of last year. I vowed to begin one of these amazing blankets come the first of the 2018 year.

A temperature blanket is a knitting/crochet project where you assign a temperature range to a rainbow of colored yarns and each day you knit/crochet a row or 2 depending on the day's temperature.

There are so many variations that can be applied to this project, you can do a different stitch depending on if it's sunny or windy or raining that day. But in the end, you have something of a record of the temperatures for that year.

In the end, I decided instead of doing the coming year that I would knit the temperatures for my daughter Evelyn's first year in our hometown. She was born on October 5th, 2016 so that day's temperature is the first row in my blanket.

Temperature Range


I decided that each color would represent a 10 degree range going from sub zero to over 100 degrees. We live in Michigan, where all of these temperatures are a possibility. If you live in a climate that doesn't have a lot of variety in temperature you can do every 5 degrees, or even every degree.

Finding Yarn


It can be difficult to find a brand of yarn that carries such an assortment of colors. Choosing the colors was by far the hardest part of this project. I decided on the Lion Brand Heartland Yarn Collection. (yarn size 4) It's a beautiful soft yarn that is heathered, giving it a rustic homespun feel. I chose earthy- jewel tones, and as it knits up, it reminds me of the rock layers in the grand canyon.

 My yarn colors:

100+       Isle Royale #189
90-99      Redwood #113
80-89      Yosemite #135
70-79      Yellowstone #158
60-69      Everglades #173 (available online only)
50-59      Joshua Tree #174
40-49      Kings Canyon #180
30-39      Cuyahoga Valley #171
20-29      Olympic #109
10-19      Glacier Bay #305
0-9          Mount Rainier #150
sub 0       Katmai #151 (available online only)

Once I found all my yarn colors, I rolled the yarn in to balls pulling from both ends of the skein so I had a double ply (knitting 2 strands at once). I made little tags with the name of the yarn and the temperature that the color represented.




Pattern/Gauge


I wanted the pattern for my blanket to be as simplistic as possible. My goal was to really let the color variation stand out. In the end, I decided to use 10.5 circular needles and to double the yarn ply.

I've cast on 200 stitches and the blanket will be 365 rows long. This should be a good size blanket somewhere around 70" by 100".

I knitted the garter stitch for 5 rows, and am knitting the garter stitch for 5 stitches to start the row, then stockinette, and ending with 5 stitches of garter. This will keep the blanket from curling.

I'm also knitting in the previous color tail into the first 5 stitches. This will save me from having to tie in all the yarn tails at the end.

I'm at the 3 month mark here and the blanket it 20" long. (October, November and December 2016)


Finding your Temperatures


October 2016
You need to decide if you are going to take the high, low, or average for the day. I am knitting the high temperature. I feel like this will give me the most variation in colors.

I am doing the temperatures from October 5th, 2016 to October 4th, 2017.

October 2016
You can find a history of weather temperatures from Weather Underground. Just type in the year and city you want to see. 



Check out our Facebook Page as I post updates as the blanket comes along.

Thursday, December 21, 2017

Fair Isle Knitted Bobble Dot Pattern

I shared this knitted item on our Facebook page and many of you said that you'd like to see the pattern.

This is my first time writing a pattern so forgive me if there are mistakes.

I would love to see photos if you decide to knit this.

And let me know your feedback on how easy/difficult it is to read the pattern.

Let me know if any of you know of an easy to use online knitting graph. I made this one in Paint Shop and PicMonkey. But it was tedious.



Materials:

5 double pointed needles size US 5 3.75mm

Worsted weight yarn cream and burgundy

Darning needle

Small crochet hook

sts - stitches
k – knit
m – make
c1 – color 1
c2 – color2
k2tog – knit 2 together
ssk – slip, slip knit


Cast on 12 sts in dominant color leaving a long tail of yarn about 12” to sew up opening at the end of project.

Divide the sts between 4 needles, each having 3 sts.

Row 1: Knit all sts c1

Row 2: For each needle c1: k1, m1, k1, m1, k1 ( 5 total sts per needle)

Row 3: Knit all sts c1

Row 4. For each needle c1, k1, m1, k3, m1, k1 (7 total sts per needle)

Row 5: Knit all sts c1

Row 6: For each needle c1, k1, m1, k5, m1, k1 (9 total sts per needle)

Row 7: For each needle knit c1, c2, c1, c2, c1, c2, c1, c2, c1

Row 8: For each needle all c1: k1, m1, k7, m1, k1 (11 total sts per needle)

Row 9: For each needle knit c1, c2, c1, c2, c1, c2, c1, c2, c1, c2, c1

Row 10: For each needle all c1: k1, m1, k9, m1, k1 (13 total sts per needle)

Row 11: For each needle knit c1, c2, c1, c2, c1, c2, c1, c2, c1, c2, c1, c2, c1

Row 12: For each needle all c1: k1, m1, k11, m1, k1 (15 total sts per needle)

Row 13: For each needle knit c1, c2, c1, c2, c1, c2, c1, c2, c1, c2, c1, c2, c1, c2, c1

Row 14: Knit all sts c1

Row 15: For each needle knit 2c1, c2, c1, c2, c1, c2, c1, c2, c1, c2, c1, c2, 2c1

Row 16: Knit all sts c1

Row 17: For each needle knit c1, c2, c1, c2, c1, c2, c1, c2, c1, c2, c1, c2, c1, c2, c1

Row 18: For each needle k1, k2tog, k9, ssk, k1 (13 sts per needle)

Row 19: For each needle knit c1, c2, c1, c2, c1, c2, c1, c2, c1, c2, c1, c2, c1

Row 20: For each needle k1, k2tog, k7, ssk, k1 (11 sts per needle)

Row 21: For each needle knit c1, c2, c1, c2, c1, c2, c1, c2, c1, c2, c1

Row 22: For each needle k1, k2tog, k5, ssk, k1 (9 sts per needle)

Row 23: For each needle knit c1, c2, c1, c2, c1, c2, c1, c2, c1

Row 24: For each needle c1: k1, k2tog, k3, ssk, k1 (7 sts per needle)

Row 25: Knit all sts c1

Row 26: For each needle c1: k1, k2tog, k1, ssk, k1 (5 sts per needle)

Row 27: Knit all sts c1

Row 28: For each needle c1: k2tog, k1, ssk, (3 sts per needle)

Pull a length of yarn about 10” and thread through a darning needle. Sew through the 12 sts left on needles to bind off and pull to cinch.

Stuff the bobble with polyfill through beginning opening. Then use the tail to sew through the rim and pull to cinch.

Using a small crochet hook crochet the tail creating a loop for the bulb to hang. Sew the end to complete the loop.

Work in remaining tails. 

Wednesday, November 22, 2017

Butterkin


This pumpkin variety looks as though it is a baby-version of the Long Island Cheese pumpkin. it has the same squat shape and buff skin, only these pumpkins grow around 4 lbs at maturity. The flavor is actually most similar to the butternut squash and can be prepared in the same way.

To learn more about different pumpkin, gourd and squash varieties, visit the Iron Oak Farm Pumpkin Page. 

Long Island Cheese Pumpkin



This is one of my favorite pumpkins. The squat Cinderella shape and understated buff skin looks waxy like a wheel of cheese. This pumpkin is perfect for pies. These pumpkins are usually heavy for their size and the flesh is sweet and plentiful.

To learn more about different pumpkin, gourd and squash varieties, visit the Iron Oak Farm Pumpkin Page. 

Delicata Squash


The Delicata Squash is a sort of cross between a winter and a summer squash. Though it has a winter squash-like outer skin, the skin is more delicate, hence the name. The squash can be prepared similar to a summer squash...steaming, sauteing etc.

To learn more about different pumpkin, gourd and squash varieties, visit the Iron Oak Farm Pumpkin Page.  

Ohio National Poultry Shop Shopping Haul, CC Post

Check out all the goodies I got while we were visiting the Ohio National Poultry Show over at Community Chickens!

Tuesday, November 21, 2017

Golden Hubbard


The Hubbard Squash has a thick, hard skin which makes it perfect for winter storage. The flesh is sweet and gets even sweeter as the squash ages. It's a great all-around squash that freezes and cans well. Good for pies and roasting.

To learn more about different pumpkin, gourd and squash varieties, visit the Iron Oak Farm Pumpkin Page.  
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